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Swedish Housing Minister demands that municipalities give immigrants boundless priority to housing

Lidingö municipality has terminated hundreds of immigrants as tenants from their permanent contracts. This because the benefit of housing only applies during the first two so-called “years of establishment” after an immigrants’ arrival. 

By – Brünnhilde

However, housing minister Peter Eriksson (MP) does not agree.

Swedish municipalities have chosen to interpret the so-called settlement law differently. The act forces municipalities to arrange housing for newly arrived immigrants.

However, according to some municipalities, this applies only during the first two “years of establishment”, since immigrants should eventually manage themselves, just as ethnic Swedes may do.

Therefore, Lidingö municipality has now terminated the lease with hundreds of migrants.

According to SVT, “some of the immigrants who” must move from Lidingö have been “crying” out in protest. Housing Minister Peter Eriksson (MP) has declared that the “law is not to be interpretated this way.”

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“Doing it this way is counteracting integration. There is no such thing as an establishment period of two years. It takes a lot of time to establish oneself in society and we will help them with it, “says Peter Erikssson.

Carl-Johan Schiller (KD), municipal council and group leader in Lidingö municipality, however, rejects the housing minister’s demands and says that immigrants have to eventually manage themselves.

However the homes now released on Lidingö will not go to Swedes, but shockingly to even more new arrivals predicted to be entering the municipality later this year.

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Read more:  From  2017/08/29

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